Unique Funny T-shirts, Movie Quote Shirts, TV Quote Shirts
CART | HELP
1-(213)-53SHIRT
Comic books can be pressed and dry cleaned for an improved condition. What is comic book pressing? How to Press Comic Books using an industrial heatpress machine. This is a free DIY FAQ instructional beginner's guide to teach how to press comics yourself at home. Updated on 12/11/2018 at 3:12 PM PST

 

T-Shirts
  Funny T-Shirts
  Movie Quote Shirts
  Political Shirts
  TV Quote Shirts

  RedBubble Exclusives



Comic Books
 How To Clean Comics
 How To Press Comics
 Comic Book Pressing
 Comic Pressing Group
 How to Ship Comics 
 Window Prep Comics
 Shipping Address

 

Research
 Good Morty Comics

 

NINJA TURTLES
 Action Figure Checklist
 Most Valuable Toys

 

FOR SALE
 eBay Listings



HOW TO PRESS COMIC BOOKS



1949 Quality Comics Group PLASTIC MAN #17
Before and After

 

 

WELCOME
Save time and money by pressing your own comic books with a heat press machine. Most supplies can be purchased directly on Amazon or eBay to save time, money, and shipping costs. I started a personal journey trying to learn the tips and tricks of pressing comic books. I wanted to learn techniques without showing any evidence of pressing or damaging a book. There have been some bumps along the way through some trial and error. This is still a guide for beginners and the basis for a way to get started. It is very humbling but you will damage some books along the way. Start small with some cheap dollar bin comic books or reader copies. I have provided links for easy re-ordering, and for clarification on materials required in this free visual FAQ guide.

 

WHAT IS COMIC BOOK PRESSING?
Comic book pressing is the process of flattening out a comic book that has been wrinkled or damaged. Comics can get bent during shipping or have creaselines from heavy reading. Good news: Comic Books can be pressed using a t-shirt heatpress machine, a book press, a stack of short boxes, or anything heavy and flat. The idea is simple: to smooth out the waves and bumps on the cover of a comic book. This makes the overall grade and eye appeal of the book increase considerably. Comic book pressing is not restoration, more like comic book conservation. The difference can sometimes mean thousands of dollars when discussing high dollar key comic books. Do NOT press a comic book with an iron.

 

 

REGIONAL CLIMATE FACTORS
Results may vary, depending on region and climate. I live in a Northwest state of the United States, so it is very humid here with lots of rain and moisture from the evergreen trees. It is also a coastal port city as well, so that adds to the climate, temperature, and elevation. If you live in the desert, you might want to increase the humidity time and use less heat at a lower temperature, for example. This is why you will see different varying opinions on the Internet for pressing books. Climate, regional, and other environmental factors weigh in on the success of pressing books where you reside. In the same vein, do not press books in your attic or garage. Dust, dirt, and humidity can also harm your books and create pebbling or divots.

This guide may seem out of order, but there are some steps and things you should know FIRST before beginning to press a book for the first time. Each book requires a different approach.

This guide will require countless hours of patience, practice and time.



 

 

SHOPPING LIST
For this guide, you will need basic comic book pressing equipment that can be purchased online. This includes the press machine and supplies for cleaning your comics. You will need the following:

  1. Patience and time for all the countless hours you will put into learning this technique.
  2. Box of 100 pairs of powder free latex gloves. Bookmark that reorder button page, too!
  3. Silicone Release Paper (SRP) ULINE has boxes of 1000 sheets cut to size for $85 shipped SAME DAY. (recommended)
  4. Conair Clothing steam humidifier gun or you can make your own Hydration Humidity Chamber (Optional, Advanced)
  5. Dental tools, specifically a dental pick and scraper.
  6. Absorene Book Cleaner putty 15 oz tub should be reordered over time and throw away each piece after each use. Cannot be reused to be effective. Do not use on Modern Age glossy covers.
  7. Absorene Dirt Eraser Pad should be reordered over time and thrown away after it has become too dirty to be effective. Cannot be cleaned.
  8. Mr Clean Magic Erasers, no scent or fragrance-free. Cut your own 1″ cubes to size. Throw away after 1 use. Cannot be reused.
  9. Lots of non glossy cardboard comic book backer boards of various sizes and thickness.
  10. 21″ box fan that uses 3 settings: Hi, Med, Lo.
  11. Golden Age sized Mylite2+Fullbacks for transporting/handling/cleaning/flipping/spinning books
  12. UV Black Light inspection flashlight for detecting pinholes and tears with sheet of copy paper under cover. UV lights are not reliable for detecting restoration.
  13. 1 gallon of distilled water. Not spring water, not bottled water, not tap water. Distilled water only.
  14. Phone or tablet for photos of your process
  15. Lotion free Kleenex tissues, a dust cloth, or a can of compressed air to blow away dust shavings while cleaning and prepping
  16. Hangar 9 Sealing Tack Iron for dimples, divots, and stubborn spine dents (Optional, Advanced)
  17. 4' ft x 5' ft work space area at minimum for your press and supplies in a climate controlled room. Do not press comics in your attic or garage.
  18. Ball bearings, a single 1.5″ diameter silver chrome ball bearing (the silver ball, not the roller inserts) for rolling across surface after using a tack iron on: divots, indents, blunted spines, and deep indentations on covers. (Optional, Advanced)
  19. Magazine Sized backer boards for use between your SRP paper and the book being pressed. (Required, Important). You will use lots of these. Buy in bulk to save money!
  20. I recommend buying 2 (two) 9" x 12" steel plates 1/8" thick or try 12" x 12" steel plates 3/16" thick once you have mastered the basics. They are a major component to this working even more successfully like an industrial dry mount book press. These plates tend to sell out quick due to this guide, so try to get a set if you can from a local metal fabricator if you cannot find them on amazon or elsewhere. (Optional, Advanced)
  21. White polymer pencil eraser caps. (Do not get the pink ones.)
  22. Flathead screwdriver (staples, positioning, pushing down flat)
  23. Putty or paint knife (staples, positioning, pushing down flat)
  24. HP premium inkjet 8.5" x 11" copy paper. (Thick premium inkjet paper). Do not get laserjet paper - it will stick to covers and pages, pulling inks.
  25. 100lb bright white cardstock paper for digital code inserts. (50 sheets) or you can look for a ream of 250 in a pack. Walmart has cardstock paper $4 for a 150 pk. Use steel plates and cardstock paper for maximum professional pressing results. (Advanced)
  26. 65lb bright white cardstock paper for use under covers for pushing out stubborn spine dents and bunched corners. (75 sheets) Use steel plates and cardstock paper for maximum professional pressing results. (Advanced)
  27. Digital calipers for measuring thickness of books. Control the required gap for your press machine.
  28. IR Thermometer for temperature validation on metal platen of your press machine. This is optional if you suspect you have a faulty thermostat. (For Seal dry mount press owners).

 

 

CHOOSE THE PRESS MACHINE RIGHT FOR YOU
Everything depends on your budget and what you feel comfortable with using. I will give you full disclosure here in this section for all avenues and pricepoints so you can make your own informed decision. I prefer option 1, the 15" × 15" Clamshell press, for the digital control unit and built in alarm. Because it’s 15" × 15", it has a larger surface area for a better press.

All 3 options are available for a very affordable price on ebay:

Option 1, 15" × 15" Clamshell press, $150-$200. https://ebay.to/2Mn81QK
Option 2, 12" × 10" Swivel mount press, $150-$200. https://ebay.to/2C8zajU
Option 3, 18" x 22" Seal dry mount press, $300-$900. https://ebay.to/2OO6Yd4

or,

Option 4, is to send your books out for pressing to a professional. This can cost $25-$50 in shipping costs and an additional $15-$30 per book to have pressed professionally.

Your budget depends on the unit you choose. Keep in mind you will be saving thousands of dollars in shipping and presser fees otherwise sent out to a professional or inhouse presser at a grading company such as CGC or CBCS.

Most professional comic book pressers recommend the Seal brand press above all. The Tivor swivel unit handle breaks off, and also requires regular adjusting of the bolts because they come loose over constant use. The Seal brand press machines range in size. They can be either 15" x 18" for the Jumbo 160 or the Jumbo 210 unit is 15" x 22" in size. Both are super heavy, so shipping cost is expensive. Buy local! This guide is written primarily using methods on a 15" x 15" Clamshell unit, but you can adjust your method accordingly depending on which unit you prefer.


 

PREPARE THE SURFACE OF YOUR HEAT PRESS MACHINE PLATE
To prep, once you have your brand new heat presss machine, you will need to use gloves and sandpaper to completely smooth over the surface of the top plate to remove machine scores, burrs, scratches or other imperfections in the steel and paint coating. I use 120 grit and 180 grit sandpaper with a block of wood. If there are deep scratches or burrs close your eyes and glide your fingertips across the surface. If you can feel the indents and scratches, you will need to keep sanding until you no longer feel surface bumps, use another plate, or replace the unit entirely. This is an important step. The plate can and will transfer any imperfections to your book covers. Let's begin:

 

 

PROPER HANDLING OF COMIC BOOKS
Make sure your work surface is clean and free of dust and debris. Comic books are very fragile. Every little thing you do to these graphic novels effects their overall condition. With this mindset, you should always wear latex gloves and use lots of bags and backer boards. When flipping a book over to its other side, use 2 comic book bags/boards or mylite2+fullbacks to support the spine. Keep a backer board at the centerfold of each book you work on for spine support. Use dental tools and pencils with eraser tops for cleaning. Always handle each book carefully and slowly. Always slide the comic book out of bag by pulling the board out of the bag at the same time as the comic book so you don't scratch the back cover. I will reinterate: Be sure you slide both book and board inside bag. Do not slide a book inside a "pre-assembled" bag and board. You will scratch the back cover of books.

 

 

 

HOW TO FLIP A BOOK OVER
Flipping the book over carefully without causing stress lines to the spine or wavy bends to cover is important. You can do this while pressing books and flipping sides. You can do this when finished pressing a comic book. The process is very simple, use another clean assembled spare bag and backer board! Avoid dark or black covers using this method (just in case) but it should be okay because you are not pressing the book down when you slide the board under it.


Have a clean bag and backer board ready that you wish to place the book on. Make sure the flat side of the backer board is toward the book and glossy side away from book. The glossy side can stick to cover in storage or under pressure over time. However, use a clean bag and backer board as the flip takes place.


Starting at the SPINE SIDE, Slide the clean bag and backer board very carefully and slowly under the front (or back) of book. Use the main backer board to hold book in place. Do not press down on the book or use any pressure when sliding the board very gently under it. You do not want to scratch the cover!


Slide the clean bag and backer board under the front (or back) of book completely slowly and carefully paying close attention so you don't scratch the book's spine or cover.

Flip the book over using both hands, one at the top, and one at the bottom.

 


Place main backer board on back of book, glossy side up and out, flat side of backer board should be on the inside, toward rear cover of book. Glossy sides can stick to rear cover under high heat conditions in storage or boxes of comic boxes too tight.


Flip the book over. Hold book firmly by the center bottom edge of book with left hand, hold book firmly by the center top edge of book with right hand.


Pinch the very center top of cover and backer board with your index finger and thumb and gently slide book into bag.

Be sure you slide both book and board inside bag. Do not slide a book inside a "pre-assembled" bag and board. You will scratch the back cover of books. Especially black or dark covers.

 

 

DOES THIS BOOK NEED TO BE PRESSED?
The first question you should ask is: Does this book need to be pressed? Signs the book would benefit from a press or dry cleaning:

  1. Non-breaking color creases
  2. Light bends on front cover or back cover
  3. Bunched spine
  4. Spine roll
  5. Folded comics
  6. Wrinkled front and back covers
  7. Production line spine bends
  8. Preparation for a comic book convention for a signing
  9. Using a third party presser prior to using a grading service for a signature series yellow label
  10. Dirt, oils, light staining
  11. Valuable
  12. Rarity

 

 

 

 


DEFECTS AND WRITING
Dry cleaning and heat-pressing comic books improves the overall look and feel of a book. It is not divine intervention. Things pressing will not fix:

  1. Miswraps
  2. Staining
  3. Foxing
  4. Rust
  5. Ink, ballpoint pen, crayon, marker, Sharpie pen
  6. Missing pages, pieces, tears
  7. Staple placement
  8. Rounded corners
  9. Edgewear
  10. Deep indentations that travel through then entire book on every page
  11. Crease lines with missing ink (color breaks)

 

 

 


DANGERS OF BAD PRESSING
While reading this guide, take special attention to this section. This guide is here to prevent damage to your books and other people's comic books as well. The guide is also here to make sure you press books in a way that do not show signs of pressing. If you have to press a book again a second or third time, it's a better option than to ruin a book forever. Multiple pressings are safe if done correctly. Grading companies will actually make you take a hit or more if there are evident signs of pressing. I've been requested to list briefly what can be done to avoid each concern. This is what to avoid at all costs:

BURNING A BOOK Use less heat - keep it under 160 F, less duration. Set a timer on your phone.
FUZZY INKS Ballpoint pen and sharpie ink will appear fuzzy or blurry. Use minimal moisture if possible. Use a lower temperature for ballpoint pen marks on cover.
COVER IS FUZZY OR BLURRY Too much moisture and humidity (over 14-18 hours). Less time in the humidity chamber (Under 8-10 hours).
FLARING Causes wavy pages and wavy cover. Removing book too soon from press or too much pressure (or both). Place a backer board at centerfold to protect the rigidness and flatness of pages.
STAPLES ARE CRUSHED OR SUCKED IN Use less pressure with pressure adjustment knob. Place a backer board at centerfold to protect staples.
SPINE IS CRUSHED OR FLAT Use less pressure with pressure adjustment knob. Place a backer board at centerfold to protect staples and spine.
WARPING AND WRINKLES ON COVER Re-using SRP paper. Throw away SRP paper after 1 use. Temperature is set way to high or there is a malfunction with thermostat on unit. Place a backer board at centerfold to protect the rigidness and flatness of pages.
DIVOTS OR CRATERS ON COVER (pebbling) Use SRP paper and magazine sized backer boards above and below the book as a disposable sterile barrier from dirt and dust debris. Wipe each book front to back with a fragrance free, lotion free kleenex. If you use steel plates be sure to sand and wipe the plates clean before use. Using a can of compressed air helps as well. If you blow with your mouth you can get saliva bubbles on book.
VERTICAL LINE traveling along spine on covers or interior pages. Too much pressure, backer board/cardstock/copypaper is not placed right up against spine as close as possible. Cardstock paper used is too thick. Try using 65 lb instead.
SHRINKAGE (cover can shrink but rest of book measures out). Too much heat. Using too thick of cardstock under front and back cover also can cause cover to shrink.
STAINING (water stains, moisture stains) . Use distilled water only. No tap water or bottled water. The minerals can and will stain your books.
SPINE ROLLS Books are stacked improperly over a long period of time or production error.
SPINE SPLITS on an otherwise near mint book. Production error, or using a backer board under covers with too much pressure.
STARCHED COMIC BOOK All pages stuck together. Enture book is starched and stuck together. Modern glossy page books require a much lower temperature setting, such as 145 or 150 degrees. Try lifting each page one at a time.
ADVERTISING COVER Ads from inside cover inks can be seen through the cover from page inks underneath. Too much moisture followed by too much pressure and heat. IE., "overdoing it".
STAPLE PUSH Staple prong pin holes on cover. Too much pressure when improper inspection should have notated the staple prongs need to be pushed down using a plastic putty knife or similar tool. Most common with glued squarebound books such as Silver Surfer 4 or Giant Size X-Men 1.
DIGITAL CODE SQUARES Marvel Digital Code Insert imprints of 1" square on last 8 pages of book, including back cover. Improper preparation for pressing a book with a digital code. The pressure of the press imprints the digital code into each page before and after the code. You must use cardstock paper or copy paper to cushion each page before and after. (Up to 4 pages before and after to back cover).
SCRATCHES Back cover is scratched. Make sure you slide a book with board inside a bag. Do not slide a book inside a pre-assembled bag and board.
RUST (Iron Oxide) or Mold on cover. Rust can form on the steel plate of press when pressing damp books from humidity chamber because moisture seeps through SRP paper if not using a buffer such as a backer board. You must also change out all paperstock and SRP paper after 10 minutes and re-press as normal before leaving overnight.
WASHED OUT COLORS Faded colors on cover. Too much humidity. Less time in the humidity chamber. Using too much pressure with erasers can also cause color rub faded colors on cover.
COCKLING Wrinkles on cover. Re-using SRP paper and cardstock or copy paper. Always use SRP paper once and done. You will imprint wrinkles from used SRP paper right into the next book you press.
SPINE DENTS Spine ticks. If you spot new spine dents that weren't there before pressing, the book was incorrectly handled prior to pressing or afterwards. Make sure when you flip a book to use 2 assembled bags and boards to create a rigid surface for flipping and transporting a book.
FINGERPRINTS If you spot new fingerprints that weren't there before pressing, the book was incorrectly handled prior to pressing or afterwards. Make sure when you press a book you always wear cotton or latex gloves. Use lotion free kleenex tissue and wipe in circles.
COVER LIFTING CURL and/or wavy. If your front or rear cover starts curling or looks wavy after pressing, you may have let the book cool down too fast or it was heated up too fast. Try leaving the press off until you have the book inside press machine and clamped down in the closed position. Then turn press machine on and let it heat up slowly and cool down slowly. Humidity may be needed to repair this book's paper fiber memory. While rare, another reason could be an outer corner crease fold with creaseline and a middle tear along bottom or top edge. This can cause the cover to curl as well.
FUSION of some pages stuck together. Book has been pressed at too hot of temperature. Modern age glossy modern comic books with glossy interior pages and cover cannot handle extreme heat temperatures. Try pressing the book at 150 or 155. To repair this, be sure to carefully unstick each page one at a time. Or, you can try slightly bending the comic book vertically down the middle. You should hear the pages unstick. Otherwise, the pages have fused to one another and this book may be ruined with color loss and ink rub when separated.
INSIDE COLOR RUB If your inside covers appear to have missing inks or color rub, scrapes, or light spots - the cover fused to a sheet of inkjet copy paper or cardstock paper. Always use inkjet paper and not laserjet copy paper. The laserjet paper will stick and pull inks. Otherwise, the book was pressed too hot and is permanently damaged. Press at 150 degrees or 155 degrees next time for glossy interior pages and covers on modern age comic books. Modern age comics cannot handle temperatures past 160-165 typically.

 

 

 

DIGITAL CODES and INSERTS (ADVANCED)
New Marvel Comics modern age comic books have digital code inserts in the last 4th page of every interior book. Some books also have Tattooz inserts or other items, such as Image #0 coupons and Mark Jeweler's Inserts. These books require a different and careful approach. You need to make certain the digital code does not press or imprint a 1" square onto the back cover and adjoining interior pages. Further down the guide you will learn how to correctly press books that feature a Marvel digital code insert sticker using cardstock paper.

 

 

 

 

BASIC PHOTOGRAPHY
Purchase a blackboard at your local art supplies store. Coldpress blackboard, used for school projects and presentation displays. They cost around $2-$5. They are soft and will not scratch your book covers. You set your book on that and spin the board around so you don't have to touch the comic book or scratch the covers while taking photos.

Looks more professional than an ugly table or background distractions.


Use a phone or tablet to take photos before, during, and after your work. Photos can provide clues to your own work as a resume for others considering your services. Photos also can show proof that damage was done to a book before you started working on the book. Photos can provide a lot of details and clues to everything. Lighting is key. Hold your camera or tablet steady before taking the shot. Do not take blurry dimly lit photos. That is worthless to you and anyone else inspecting your work. Take all your photos under a well lit room with lots of windows during the daytime. Take photos at every angle of the book so you can see the bumps, waves, bends, creases, and folds of the book in question. Start a facebook photo album if you don’t own a website or gallery page. Photos mean everything! If it's night time, wait until tomorrow for better lighting. If you don’t have time, make time.

 

This is not a good example of a photo that displays your work.

 

This photo displays the entire book in one shot, with lighting at an angle to show others the overall “sheen” or “shine” of the surface of book. Lighting is key.

 

 

WORK AREA AND DESK SURFACE
Be sure your work surface area is clean and smooth. Using mylite2+fullback for sharp edges for protection as a barrier under the book can prevent surface wear and staple rub.

Always use gloves. Always. No fingerprints! Heat is the number one ingredient for a successful press. That heat can also transfer oils from your skin to the plate or the comic book. Before you start using the press, put on some latex gloves. I prefer the small size so you get a firm sensitive grip.

A clean, smooth, and flat work surface is crucial when cleaning and pressing comic books.

You can prevent un-necessary surface rub or wear on the book being cleaned or handled. The best way to do this is to use Golden Age size Mylite2 + Fullback boards to handle and transport books. You can even use 2 mylites+fullbacks above and below the book to flip the book over easily as well. Magazine sized bag + board also works well too. I use a glass artist table folded down flat with a cutting mat on top of that. I have placed a sheet of plexiglass down on top of the cutting mat as well for a smooth shiny surface to work with. It’s a good idea to keep a Golden Age size Mylite2 + Fullback board underneath the book while on the desk surface so you can swivel and slide the book without damaging it.

You do not want to spin the book on a bare table surface. Ever. Next you can gently place a Golden Age size Mylite2 + Fullback board inside the cover of the side of the book you are cleaning. This places firm pressure on the other side of the surface you are cleaning without risk of damaging the spine. A magazine sized backer board and bag will work as well.

Place a mylite2+fullback or magazine sized backer board and bag inside your cover being cleaned but not all the way against the spine. Don’t press too hard either when cleaning or you will have a light visible vertical line running down along the spine you will have to press out later.

 

 

 

 

PREPARATION FOR GLUED SQUAREBOUND BOOKS
Cut one inch strips of backer boards using a paper cutter or straight-edge and razor blades. Use those 1" strips of backer boards and make a stack of them the same exact height of spine you are pressing. Slide that stack of 1 inch strips up against the spine of your book about to be pressed. Trying this trick will prevent the spine from being crushed. This include books such as Silver Surfer 4, Giant Size X-Men 1, or any Giant Size Marvel comic book.

Cut 1" strips of backer boards that are 1"x10.25" and stack them the same height as squarebound book you are pressing. Place right up against spine and make your boardstack as usual. This prevents spine crushing and is the most effective way.

 

 

 

UV BLACK LIGHT INSPECTION
Use a UV Black-Light inspection flashlight to detect pinholes and tears on cover with a sheet of inkjet copy paper underneath cover. A blacklight flashlight does not show as much as you would think. It's not a reliable tool but can spot some color touch.

There are some things a UV Black light can reveal:

  • Boogers
  • Saliva
  • Chalk
  • Crayon
  • Oil Pastel Crayons
  • Oil paint
  • Feces
  • Body fluids (saliva, urine, etc)
  • Food stains
  • Duller discoloration spot
  • Brighter discoloration spot
  • Cleaner detergents
  • Petroleum Jelly
  • Salt
  • Ketchup
  • Vinegars
  • Holes or tears using copy paper under cover/page

 

What does NOT show up under UV Black Light Inspection:

  • Blood
  • Rust
  • Kool-Aid
  • Tea
  • Coffee
  • Mold
  • Mildew
  • Black Sharpie

 

 

 

 

THE INSPECTION PROCESS
Wear a fresh pair of latex gloves as you get started. Take a moment to examine the book. Always lift comic books out with the backer board as you slide them out of the bag. You do not want to scratch the back cover. Do not press books with food, gum, or candy debris. You will need to remove it prior to pressing. Even if this means scraping or damaging part of the book to get it off. Sometimes color breaks and ink removal are part of the debris removal. You have to use judgement and experience whether it will benefit or harm the book's overall value, condition, and appearance. Mark Jeweler insert comic books and other books with centerfold posters should be okay. Digital codes and tattooz inserts are different and will require a few extra steps covered elsewhere in the guide.

Okay, so what are you looking for prior to pressing or cleaning a comic book? Research is part of your job. Especially if the book is to be sent off for grading with CGC or CBCS or PGX. Look at every angle, every corner of the book. Take photos with your tablet or phone. Take extra time to inspect the corners and spine around the staples. What is the difference between a 9.8 and a 9.6? 1 tiny color breaking spine tick. Seriously. Assume that all books are a 5.0 and add or subtract points based off the following criteria:

  1. Look for and count the spine ticks.
  2. Color breaking lines along the spine.
  3. Rounded corners.
  4. Edge-wear along the spine.
  5. Edge-wear along the top and bottom covers.
  6. Edge-wear on the corners.
  7. Production error lines.
  8. Scrapes or light scratches on the back cover.
  9. Amateur restoration techniques.
  10. Super valuable key books should be inspected for color touch, just in case.
  11. Staple replacement. Verify staple prongs line up with indents.
  12. Gloss or missing gloss on cover.
  13. Writing on cover.
  14. Writing on interior pages.
  15. Missing interior wraps. (may or may not effect story)
  16. Inserts. (research: poster centerfold, advertisements, tattooz, stickers, coupons)
  17. Spine splits at top or bottom.
  18. 1" or longer tear on cover.
  19. Page Quality. (White, Off-White, Cream, Tan)
  20. Page count. (research: verify there are no missing pages)
  21. Rust, Foxing, or Tanning. (brown or black spots)

 

Use a dental pick and scraper to carefully lift and place tears or folds where they should be before pressing or cleaning.

As long as the book is not brittle or rigid… Look for corner flaps and tears that need to be set in place. This step should be done first while the book is dry and not under any heat or pressure. You will use a dental pick and scraper for this step. If the book is too brittle or old, then you should use the humidity chamber approach after cleaning the covers instead.

It may be tempting to just use your fingernail, but could potentially rip or tear the crease worse. Dirt and oil under your fingernails could get trapped in the paper fibers as well. Golden age books are very forgiving with corner flaps and minor tears.

You want to do this step first before cleaning or pressing. This step is important to try to inspect the book carefully and turn each page for inspection. You are also looking for cutouts, missing pages, and missing centerfolds during this stage.

 

 

Absorene Dirt Eraser Pads are the greatest tool to start with dry cleaning the cover of your book. Get one here at this link on Amazon.

 

 

DRY CLEANING COMIC BOOK TIPS
Use a dental pick and scraper to carefully lift and place tears or folds where they should be before pressing or cleaning. For dry cleaning, it’s always best to start in a non-aggressive manner, so start small with just a simple clean eraser from a Number 2 pencil. I also use eraser tops as well. You will need to clean your pencil eraser often as you lift the dirt and oils from your comic book.



Cleaning a book should be approached in stages. Starting with latex rubber gloves, use a dental pick for lifting up folds and creases. Do this first. Lightly dust off and wipe the surface clean lightly with a lotion free Kleenex, dust cloth, or a can of compressed air. Try using a regular unsharpened #2 pencil eraser end to remove light staining on cover. This noninvasive method is recommended before using anything else.

 

 

DRY CLEANING COMIC BOOK TOOLBOX

Use all the tools in your toolbox for dry cleaning comics. This ranges from non-invasive to more aggressive stages of comic book dry cleaning.


My dry cleaning toolbox of various tools and cleaners. The Ez-Off is for the metal plates and platens of machines. You will likely not use that. Take notice of the ball bearing, magnifying glass, jeweler's loop, kneaded eraser, natural sea sponges, pencils with eraser tops, UV blacklight flashlight, Absorene putty, and two Absorene book cleaner pads.

 

Start small and work your way down the list one-by-one as needed:

1. Finger from a latex glove
2. Pencil Eraser Head Top + Absorene Book Cleaner Pad (for cleaning eraser top)
3. Unscented Dryer Sheet with eraser head as a "handle"
4. Unscented Paper Towel with eraser head as a "handle"
5. Absorene Eraser Pad
6. Absorene Book Cleaner Putty
7. Unscented/untreated original Mr Clean Magic Eraser 1" cube
8. Natural sea sponges

And if you alternate all of them together you will yield better results. For instance, go back and forth between the magic eraser and absorene book cleaner putty along the spine to clean out all the dirt that gets pushed into the trenches of the creases.

The Mr. Clean Magic Eraser is harsh and should be used lightly on light colored or white colored covers and avoid red/black/yellow if you can.

 

 

#1 recommended method to clean comics is a simple pencil eraser. Use the Absorense Eraser Pad to clean your pencil eraser top as it gets dirty during cleaning.

 

Next, if you have an Absorene Dirt Eraser Pad, wipe this across the surface of both front and back covers. Use the eraser pad lightly, let the weight of the pad be the only pressure as you gently glide it across the cover surface to remove dirt and oil.

Dirt and oil grime from production on a brand new modern age marvel 1:1000 retailer incentive copy of Venom #1 (2018)

 

(After) Dirt and oil grime removed from production on a brand new modern age marvel 1:1000 retailer incentive copy of Venom #1 (2018) Using a simple pencil eraser top.

 

So this is a pretty big secret, even if you don’t press comics. You can clean most comic book covers in this manner, regardless if you are pressing the book or not! You don’t need a press in order to perform this method.

 

 

 

Use Absorene putty next to delicately lift dirt and oils. You roll lightly and gently across the surface to remove and clean the paper at its fibers. If you do not have Absorene, try using a regular pencil eraser or a gum kneaded eraser. You will have to knead and work in the eraser until it becomes soft like the Absorene. Never rub the kneaded eraser, always blot or push downwards then lift upwards with straight up and down motions. Never use the kneaded gum eraser sideways or against the paper grain. Most of the time, 90% of the time, the pencil eraser and absorene eraser pad will do most of the work for you. If you cannot lift a stain, that’s okay – just remember we are not restoring comic books.

Go slow with the Absorene around corners and tears. You should place a perpendicular mylite2+fullback or magazine sized backer board and bag against your hand so that you do not lift up the cover or page being cleaned.

 

HOW TO USE ABSORENE PUTTY
Absorene comes inside a small plastic storage tub. It looks and feels like Play-doh. You want to take small 1/2″ cubes and roll it across the surface of your book covers and pages for dry chemical free cleaning. You will roll very lightly with light pressure as you roll “logs” across the surface being cleaned. I also have great results with warming the book up in the press for 5 minutes on each side on low heat at 150 degrees. When using the Absorene, take great care along cover edges and corners or you will lift up the cover unexpectedly and cause a crease. Worse yet, if you go too fast due to being impatient with your time – you can cause a rip and tear the cover. It helps tremendously to use backer boards to the left and right of the areas being rolled with Absorene. Try it to see if this works for you.

 

ABSORENE BOOK CLEANER PUTTY WARNING
Absorene Book Cleaner Putty should be used only on older books with covers that are not glossy or shiny. Avoid modern comic books with paper thin covers. The putty can easily rub into the book cover and cause severe and permanent damage. This is why I would suggest trying a pencil eraser or kneaded eraser on Modern Age books, instead. The Absorene Book Cleaner Putty works best on Silver Age, Copper Age, Dark Age and even most Bronze Age books. Any book produced after the year 2000 should be tested out on a reader copy first when considering the Absorene Putty. See below:

2018 Marvel Comics VENOM #3 San Diego Comic Con Exclusive

 

USING MR CLEAN MAGIC ERASERS AND ABSORENE TOGETHER
Cut 1″ cubes of Mr Clean Magic Eraser to alternate from Absorene Book Cleaner Putty and Magic Eraser along spines. Never reuse a magic eraser cube. Apply firm but gentle pressure against book. Erasers are best used for white or light covers. Avoid red and black with the magic eraser!

Notice the following book also is a white cardstock cover. This is the best method for that type of paperstock and cover. Thin paperstock covers or glossy covers should be treated using a different method of approach.

 

For small spaces or around dark print area, use a pencil eraser with a tiny torn off piece of clean magic eraser material. Use the pencil as a hand tool to better control the magic eraser around corners, spines, or red/black/yellow print area.

Magic Erasers are great for white rear covers or white front covers. Warning: Black, Red and Yellow ink are easily lifted off the cover with the Magic Eraser! Use a Mr. Clean magic eraser very carefully. Always cut fresh 1” cubes with scissors. If you try to keep re-using the same magic eraser, you will start rubbing dirt into all the crease lines of comics, which creates new dark crease lines and makes the visual appeal start to drop significantly, so be warned about the magic eraser! Use this product with light pressure. Never use circular swirls when trying to lift up staining with a magic eraser. Make swift light strokes in one direction, never back and forth, and never in swirls. This will take time. Do not wax on and wax off. You only wax one way. You do not want to send the very same dirt lifted up from the magic eraser into a crease line crevice or crack on cover.

For small spaces or around dark print area, use a pencil eraser with a tiny torn off piece of clean magic eraser material. Use the pencil as a hand tool to better control the magic eraser around corners, spines, or red/black/yellow print area.

This is why you should alternate with the Absorene and the Magic Eraser. After using the Magic Eraser, it causes white powder dust shavings filled with dirt and oil. Even using a new Magic Eraser cube will push those shavings and dust back into the cracks and crevices of the spine being worked on. You will need to blow the dust away with a can of air. Alternate and use the Absorene to clean the area just cleaned with the Magic Eraser. Back and forth. Patience is key. Sometimes it feels like the Absorene just isn’t working but it is. Keep at it and you will eventually start to see staining and other debris being lifted slowly. It takes time to figure this one out. The magic eraser is very forgiving on white or light covers. However, use extreme caution using this technique on all black covers or very dark covers. The magic eraser does lift ink! Because of this, most professionals do not advise using a Mr Clean Magic Eraser. Most will suggest to use Absorene, because it is actually made for cleaning historical documents and archival paper such as the Library of Congress. If you are just starting out and learning the whole process, try using these products on some cheap books first to get a feel of the process. Remember, this is just a guide for beginners!

 

Before and after back cover photos of upper right corner dirt oil buildup along a staple bump. Magic Eraser and Absorene did wonders to this corner with minimal effort to lift the staining.

 

Before and after back cover photos of upper right corner dirt oil buildup along a staple bump. Magic Eraser and Absorene did wonders to this corner with minimal effort to lift the staining.

 

 

DRY CLEANING IN STAGES
What I do is approach every book with cautious cleaning tactics first, to see what is effective with the least effort. Less invasive first, to a more increased aggressive cleaning stage each time, to see what works. I like to start small, slowly increasing my efforts:

Start by carefully chipping or scraping away gunk, boogers, candy, or mud with a dental pick. Press down staples flat with a putty knife or flathead screwdriver.

1. Used dryer sheet.
2. Kleenex lotion free tissue.
3. Number 2 pencil with a white polymer eraser cap.
4. Clean eraser cap regularly with absorene eraser pad.
5. Absorene eraser pad across cover surfaces.
6. Absorene book cleaner putty across cover surfaces. (But not glossy Modern Age Books)
7. Mr Clean Magic Eraser tiny cubes cut, rub along spine and light colored surfaces of cover. No black or red or yellow inks.
8. Alternate between magic eraser and absorene eraser pad to remove magic eraser shavings.
9. Deep staining or moisture stains cannot be removed using these basic non-invasive dry cleaning methods.

 

 

 

 

 

FINGERPRINTS AND SCRATCHES ON GLOSSY OR FOIL COVERS
Wear latex gloves. Use a small 2" square of SRP Paper and spin a pencil eraser top back and forth for a long deep scratch. Use a lotion free, fragrance free kleenex tissue folded and start lightly buffing in circles using little to no pressure at all for light or faint scratches. Unscented dryer sheets sometimes work, too. Many deep scratches on black covers cannot be removed.

For fingerprints, wear gloves and use two wadded up lotion free, fragrance free kleenex tissues, buffing in circles using little to no pressure at all. It helps to exhale your warm breath across the surface before buffing an area. The safest method for fingerprints and scratches is:

1. Wear gloves
2. Lotion free, fragrance free kleenex tissues
3. Buff in circles using little to no pressure at all

 

 

 

 

STAPLES
Staples can push through the front and rear cover. Dirt and oil like to get trapped around elevated bumps along staple on back cover. If you can already detect staple rub on the front or back cover you should probably use copy paper or a backer board inside the cover. Press with lighter pressure using the adjustment screw on press machine. Squarebound books like Silver Surfer #4 or Giant Size X-Men #1 have this effect with staples and pressing. Cleaning staples is not recommended either. Watch for rub and try not to clean them or scratch them up too much. It can be evident if there is staple cleaning with third party Grading Companies such as CGC and CBCS so I caution you on scuffing up staples. Rusty staples should be lightly scuffed but I would not recommend it.

 

 

 

DO-IT YOURSELF SPECIALIZED EQUIPMENT
Some books will benefit from humidity to loosen up the paper fibers for a more successful pressing. “There are three basic steps to humidification: cleaning, humidifying, and weighting or flattening. Each step requires somewhat specialized equipment that can be easily constructed from materials gathered from common sources, such as hardware and fabric stores." Further in the guide, under advanced topics, you will learn more about how humidity works in the process prior to pressing a heavily creased or folded comic book.

 

 

DRY CLEAN FIRST, HUMIDIFICATION SECOND, PRESS LAST
It is important to remember that any dirt on the surface of the paper may become muddy during humidification and will set further into the paper fibers. This will make the paper difficult if not impossible to clean in the future. The surface of the paper should at least be swept with a soft, natural fiber brush before humidification. If the papers are heavily soiled, consult a paper conservator about surface cleaning before proceeding.

Before proceeding with humidification, remove fasteners such as clips, staples, brads, and rubber bands.

Extreme care must be used when initially opening papers that have been folded or rolled. While some papers remain supple over time, others may grow increasingly fragile due to inherent weaknesses, widely fluctuating temperature and relative humidity, or exposure to light and/or to chemicals in the atmosphere. As a result, paper remembers creases, folds, and curls. If records are not flattened carefully, they may crumble and their valuable information will be irretrievably lost. Never attempt to open a rolled or folded piece of paper if you are uncertain of its physical condition, particularly if the climate is extremely dry (less than 35% relative humidity)."

SOURCE: https://www.nps.gov/museum/publications/conserveogram/13-02.pdf

 

 

 

PRACTICE ON PRESSING 7 TYPES OF BOOKS
You will need to practice first on 7 basic types of comic books to learn the process slowly. Practice on your own books first. Practice treating each book as if it were priceless.

  1. Golden Age Books are brittle, require steam or humidity, and require extra care when handling.
  2. Silver Age Books can also be quite brittle, and have edgewear like crazy. Watch for rusty staples.
  3. Bronze Age Books have a different type of paper, semigloss and with inserts.
  4. Modern Age Books with Glossy Magazine Paper books can have pages stick together if too hot! Under 150F and under 5-7 minutes at a time. (5 minutes on each side) The pages will stick together otherwise and you will create a razor blade comic book. It is not necessary to place one sheet of Silicone Release Paper (SRP) between each page of the entire book before pressing to avoid pages sticking together so long as you do not go any higher than 150 degrees.
  5. Foil books (Convention exclusives) are more intimidating if anything. Watch your fingerprints! Always wear gloves. Same rules apply as if it were a glossy modern with glossy pages. Too hot and too long will ruin the book! Keep a backer board at the centerfold for foil books.
  6. Modern Marvel books have digital code inserts found at the last 4 pages. You will need to use 100 lb cardstock paper, copypaper sheets, or a backer board to prevent the 1″ square digital code from imprinting on last 4-5 pages and back cover.
  7. Gimmick Books are books that have die cut, embossed, glow-in-the-dark, hologram, or lenticular covers. Embossed covers will need to be cushioned with cardstock paper. Gimmick books can be safely pressed using less pressure under low heat (150-155 degrees) for 5-7 minutes and left overnight in a cold press machine. Heating up glow-in-the-dark comic book covers actually re-activate the glow powder crystals in the paint, which effectively make the glow effect appear brighter with bolder colors. Cardstock covers are tough and resiliant so they should be pressed with cardstock paper or backer board underneath cover.

 

 

 

SAFE BOOKS
Books that have been tested 100% safely that can be pressed under high heat:

  1. Glow-in-the-Dark Covers
  2. Hologram Covers
  3. Embossed Covers
  4. Lenticular Covers
  5. Die cut Covers
  6. Sketch Covers
  7. Sharpie Signed Covers
  8. Foil Edition Covers
  9. Thick Cardstock Covers
  10. Silver or Gold Edition Covers

 

NOT SAFE UNPRESSABLE BOOKS
Books that have been tested that which have shattered, buckled, crumbled, or been destroyed under high heat conditions:

  1. Holofoil Covers
  2. Chromium Covers
  3. Textured Covers (Artist Edition)
  4. Acetate Covers
  5. Glued Spine Miswrapped/Rolled Covers
  6. Paint Marker Signed Covers
  7. Remarks done with Paint Markers on Covers


There are more to practice on, but this is a great head start for the learning process. Different books require different angles of approach. Practice how you handle a comic book as well. Always wear gloves. Always lift and remove comics from their bag/board by pulling the entire comic and board from the bag. Always use a second bag/board to flip books over so they are supported. Chromium cover books or holofoil books cannot be pressed. The required and necessary heat will melt the covers and shatter the art into spiderweb patterns.

 

 

PRESSURE KNOB ON 15 x 15" CLAMSHELL MACHINE
Use the adjustment screw and washer to adjust for pressure sensitivity against thickness of book. It takes time and practice to master this through experience. Always use light pressure. Counter clockwise backs the pressure force down by 1/16" each full turn.

 

 

 

 

SWIVEL PRESS MACHINE VARIATION ADJUSTMENTS
For the smaller swivel model variation of heat press machines, you will need to watch that top long bolt at the very back top side of unit the adjustment knob resides on. This applies to the 9x12" or the 12x10" versions. Over time the entire shaft or bolt itself becomes loose. It is necessary to finger tighten the bolt when consistently using the swivel action back and forth between presses. Also, you will need to wrap the entire handle with black electrical tape so it doesn't snap off in your hands.


The swivel mount heat press has a weak impact zone at the handle. Over time this will snap off in your hand.


Use electrical tape to prevent handle from snapping off the swivel mount press machines.

 

 

 

 

MAKING THE INITIAL PRESS
Make sure when the hot metal plate is going down on the book that it clamps down with firm yet little resistance. You are not wanting to press the handle down so hard that it takes great feats of human strength to clamp down on the comic book. If you are doing this, then you are creating razor blade spines to shave with. Do not create razor blade spines. This also can cause staples to push through front cover or spine. This is known as “staple popping”. This can also cause the staples to appear sunken into the book as well. Use caution and self control when pressing the plate down on the book being pressed. This is crucial to a successful press. The goal here is to press with the mindset of a grading company looking at your book. Smoothness and glossiness. Deep folds and color breaking crease lines cannot be fixed. Press so that is is not evident you pressed the book.

 

 

TEMPERATURE SETTINGS
Paper burns at 451 degrees fahrenheit. Most comic books can be safely pressed at 170 degrees but not any higher. Glossy comic books with glossy paper will melt and stick pages together if using temperatures higher than 160. I typically press most comics at 155 degrees. Brand new modern age comic books, foil edition covention exclusive books, glossy paper comic books, magazines, and books with inserts should be at a lower temperature, at 140-150 degrees but left in the press a lot longer to compensate for the lower temperature. I have success with 150 degrees for just 5 minutes on each side for glossy moderns, without making all the pages stick together.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDED TEMPERATURE DURATIONS
Determine what age the book is. Then determine what type of cover and paperstock the interior pages are made from. I would not press a book under high heat for longer than 15 minutes per session. Too much heat can cause flaring and damage a book. If your press machine does not have a built in digital timer, you should get one or set your phone timer.

 

 

 

The following chart displays recommended times and temperatures per book, per side, per flip:

 

Age
Year
Cover
Interior
Fahrenheit
Minutes
Flip
             
Modern
2010-Present
Glossy
Glossy
150
7
Yes
             
Modern
2000-2011
Glossy
Flat
155
6
Yes
             
Modern
1996-2000
Semi-gloss
Flat
160
5
Yes
             
Modern
2015-Present
Foil
Glossy
150
5
Yes
             
Dark
1986-1996
Glossy
Flat
150
8
Yes
             
Bronze
1970-1986
Flat
Flat
155
7
Yes
             
Bronze
1970-1986
Glossy
Flat
150
5
Yes
             
Silver
1956-1970
Flat
Flat
160
6
Yes
             
Golden
1938-1956
Flat
Flat
160
8
Yes
             
Golden
1938-1956
Flat
Newspaper
160
10
Yes

If you are using metal steel plates in your press, you will not flip the book. You will place book inside press and turn on press to desired temperature and shut off press without waiting for timer, and without flipping book.

 


After the heat press stage is complete, you will shut off the press. Leave the book in the press with the temperature shut off and cool down for several hours. 6 hours is minimum time before removing from press. Probably ideal to leave the book in the press for 24 hours or more.

 

 

SEAL PRESS MACHINE TEMPERATURE VALIDATION
This advice is for owners of a Bienfang or Seal brand laminating dry mount press machine. If you have a 15x15 clamshell press or swivel model unit t-shirt press machine, you may skip this section.

The thermostat (all of the seal presses have a thermostat) is the control knob and some have a temp gauge (while some do not). There is a Trimac relay in some older models that may need to be removed/replaced for proper operation. To verify and validate you are pressing books at the correct temperature, you will need to purchase an IR Thermometer. (Link provided at top of guide). Heat press to 200F. With a partially closed press machine, open and read slowly from left to middle. Next, partially close press and open, read from right to middle. (Partially closed means platen down , but not closed all the way.) Both readings on thermometer gun should be within 5 degrees -/+ of 200F. If not adjust thermostat knob. If adjusting thermostat does not work, replace the thermostat unit. The part is readily available from the catalog online. If you have the correct temperature on one side of platen and the other side is cooler then it's time to replace the metal platen. Another problematic part could be the triac relay - this applies to older units.

You can order common Seal or Bienfang dry mount press machine replacement parts at this site: http://www.omegabrandess.com/products/Parts

 

For maintenance, troubleshooting, thermostat adjustment, part numbers and servicing your Seal Brand Dry Mount Press Machine, download the manufacturer's manual here:

 


Download the Seal Dry Mount Press Machine Manual Here

For Triac relay removal procedure, if they are still in the machine they should be removed (only in older machines, they did away with them in newer models).

 


Download the Seal Triac Relay Removal Procedure Here

 

 

For conversion from old thermostat to new thermostat unit. The older ones had wire screws the newer ones are press on . The conversion is in the document.

 


Download the Seal Thermostat Conversion Wire Diagram Here

 

 

DURATION OF PRESS
In order to maintain the pressing, and not have “muscle memory” of creases and spine bumps, you have to let the book be completely cold inside the press before removing it. Heat is the number one ingredient for a successful press. Pressure is number two. These 2 main core principles are crucial to the pressing process. Humidity and moisture are varying factors depending on paperstock and condition. Most books can be cooled down quicker than naturally. If you just simply use a standard $20 box fan at the store, this will cut your cooling down time to 8-12 hours instead of 1-2 days. You can also buy a second identical press and use that one as a “cooling press” as the other cools down. Alternate for 2-step pressing to save time and maximize your time constraints. If you are having trouble pressing a book, leave it in the press for several days or even a week!



Basic one time press under high heat for 10 minutes and left in press machine for 24 hours. This book could use another press one more time to get that last bit of faint vertical bend traveling along spine.

After the second press the faint spine bend is gone. 1985 Crisis on Infinite Earths Issue #8.

Be sure you feel the top of the plate with your hands before removing any book from the press. You are making sure the press plate is ICE COLD. Not even warm or room temperature. Make sure the press plate is cold to the touch. If you have a second press, place the book inside the press that has a completely cold press plate for faster cooling.

 

 

 

WAVY COVERS AND EDGE FLARING
Protect the rigidness and flatness of the interior pages by placing a magazine sized backer board at the centerfold of all books being pressed. This will also protect the staples as well. Otherwise you books will flare and have wavy pages. If you take the book out of the press too soon or too much heat (or both), it causes corner flares. This does not ruin the book, but it does require a second press at less heat with an overnight cooldown time of 24-48 hours. Too much moisture can also cause a wavy cover. Remember, most books do not need humidity. Try experimenting with different humidity times and cool down times based on your climate. If your book has flaring you should lower the heat duration and humidity levels when pressing the book in question.

 

Flaring is caused by too much heat, too much pressure, or too much moisture. Sometimes all of the above are contributing factors. Less is more. Removing the book too soon from the press while still hot can also cause flaring. Always use a magazine sized backer board at the centerfold for all books being pressed. The only time you do not use a backer board at centerfold is for glued or squarebound comic books.

 

 

 

REVERSION AFTER PRESSING
While rare, reversion can happen. Check back and verify your book retained a good press after several weeks. I recommend this step especially if you are pressing a book for a client, friend, or a grading company! It is entirely possible to come back several months later only to find your hard work performed on the book reverted back to it’s previous state. If this happens, you are definitely going to have to press the book for a week or longer to keep it’s shape and press. Some books can be stubborn. Don't doubt your pressing abilities, just accept the fact some books will need to be pressed several times to behave.

 

 

BACKER BOARDS INSTEAD OF SRP AGAINST PLATE?
Use backer boards in stacks of three (3) above and below your book inside the press machine. Why use 3? Why even use backer boards at all? Why not just use SRP paper and book inside press? The backer boards act as a buffer from the steel plate on the press machine. These machines often have burrs or imperfections you have to sand down so it doesn't indent onto the surface of the cover of your book. The boards will absorb the temperature from the plate. But, the bottom half not so much, which is why you have to flip. Also, using backer boards forces you, as the human element of the equation, to always use a new set of boards that are clean and most likely free of dust, dirt, debris, or other contaminates that can leave a dimple or divot in the book covers. Lastly, if someone has graduated to steel plates in their press, you have to be extra careful for the same reasoning of leaving dust, dirt, or debris left over from a former book, etc., you have to wipe your steel plates clean before and after each use or you will have tiny craters in your book covers. Because steel is metal and an excellent conductor, the bottom plate gets just as hot as the top plate, so there is no need to flip. It is always a risk to accidentally cause pebbling on a book cover surface. It's still a good idea to use one backer board on top and bottom of your book as a buffer from the steel plates to prevent pebbling. Always wear latex gloves, and always work in a clean, sterile environment. Which brings me to the next topic...

 

 

PEBBLING
Be sure to use magazine backer boards as a buffer between your book and the press machine. Silicone Release Paper (SRP) on your books and documents inside press. “Pebbling” can cause divots on the surface of a book if the press plate or pressure pad isn’t clean.

 

Make sure the silicone mat and pressure plate are clean and free of debris. Make sure the pressure plate and silicone release paper being used against the book is clean and free of dirt. “Pebbling” can cause divots on the surface of a book if not the press plate or pressure pad isn’t clean. This is caused by anything from a speck of dust, dirt, or cleaning shavings from using Absorene or Magic Eraser.


 

SANDWICH RECIPES
You must have a completely flat surface larger than the book being pressed. You want to make a comic book sandwich. The magazine board at the centerfold should be pressed up snugly against the staples but not underneath the staple prongs. The cardstock paper, copy paper, or backer boards placed inside interior pages should be pushed up snug and even against the spine as close as possible without movement. The copy paper or SRP paper placed underneath covers should be pressed up completely flush against the spine. If you are not careful with the placement of interior pages or use too much pressure, you will cause vertical lines to travel down length of spine vertically. It is important you do not use too much pressure and you have your copy paper sheets pressed firmly up against the spine. Use digital calipers or a ruler and measure the total thickness of comic book and board stacks. This will help you determine the gap thickness required by using the pressure adjustment knob at the top rear of your press machine. If a front or back cover is more severe I would place aforementioned side up towards to press machine's heat plate.

 

Most books will follow one of 3 basic sandwich recipes. Digital codes have 2 versions. I will explain:


 


 

 

 

 

 

USING CARDSTOCK INSTEAD OF COPY PAPER
65 lb. cardstock paper works signficantly better than copy paper. When placed under the front and/or rear cover, 1 sheet of 65 lb cardstock paper does the job of 2 sheets of copy paper. You will get maximum results from spine damaged books using cardstock. Trust me. Use 65 lb cardstock paper for use under covers for pushing out stubborn spine dents and bunched corners during high heat dry pressing. 100lb cardstock paper is good for protecting digital code inserts and prevention of pushing indents onto back pages and back cover. Here are the cardstock sandwich recipes for making your press-stack:

Most books will follow one of 3 basic sandwich recipes. Digital codes have 2 versions. I will explain:


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOW YOU ARE READY
Halfway down this guide, you are now ready to press a comic book. Here is where it is finally discussed in great detail how pressing a comic book works. Please read through all steps carefully before you begin. Always test this method out first on cheap dollar bin comic books until you are comfortable and ready to move onto more valuable books.

 

HOW TO PRESS A BOOK
You can avoid “Pebbling” and surface patterns by setting two or three magazine sized backer boards on mat. You want to make a comic book sandwich. You can press a comic book in 20 steps. Here is a visual of that concept simplified:

1. Get magazine backer boards ready. Warm up press machine to desired temperature and wait until it is HOT and ready. Make sure backer boards are flat side out, glossy side inwards away from book or plate.

 

2. 100 lb cardstock paper, or the above pictured Super Bright 165 whiteness Inkjet copy paper is used as a buffer for digital codes, tattooz inserts, or other inserts inside a comic book. Do not use Laserjet copy paper. Laserjet copypaper can lift ink from glossy covers and glossy interior pages. Remember, cardstock paper works best for stubborn spine dents and Marvel digital code inserts. Some books will require copy paper vs cardstock paper, due to the cardstock paper being too thick. Thinner 65lb cardstock paper or copypaper can get closer to the spine. Covers can split or come apart from the spine if you use the wrong method - so carefully study the spine and thickness when determining what to use.

 

3. Clean and prepare the 15x15" Clamp Style heat press machine surface.

 

4. Get 3 magazine backer boards. Stack them on heat press machine. Glossy side down away from plate. Make sure backer boards are flat side out, glossy side inwards away from book or plate.

 

5. Get 3 magazine backer boards. Stack them on heat press machine.

 

6. Set a sheet of cut SRP (Silicone release paper) on your stack of 3 backer boards.

 

7. You can buy large 16×24 inch sheets of SRP paper from ULINE and cut them into 4 smaller sheets.

 

8. You cannot reuse SRP paper. It can press wrinkles onto the cover of the next book. Do not reuse copy paper. It is scrap paper after 1 use. Backer boards can be reused, some people say do not reuse. Some people even say to change backer boards when you flip the book. I re-use backer boards only once during a flip of one pressing. I also will re-use a "used only once" board for when I press damp books from a humidity chamber. (But only one time then trash)

 

9. Place a backer board at centerfold. Place the board up against the staples. Do not place the backer board under the staple prongs. The backer board is acting as the same height of the staples, so as to not imprint staples into the interior pages of the book. If you place it underneath the staple prongs, you will have indents from both staples on the opposite side of staple. Trust me. If you have spine ticks, place 2 sheets of copy paper under front cover and back cover. Depending on how deep the spine ticks are, you may need to place copy paper at page 2 and page 3 of front and back of covers. Make certain your copy paper and boards are snug up against the spine as close as possible.

 

9b. If you have a digital code in your book, see recipe above for the stacking of paper and boards. If the book is thin with fewer pages, you can use a magazine backer board or sheets of copy paper on the following page of digital code insert. Thicker books require cardstock paper or backer boards. Do not reuse your copy paper. It is now scrap paper after 1 use.

 

 

Or an older Marvel comic with the larger 2" square digital code insert like this:

Avenging Spider-man #9 has a large 2" digital code insert on last page. Use 3 sheets of copy paper as a buffer for the back cover. Use 2 sheets of paper as a buffer on the page before the last page. You will press using light pressure.

 

Older digital code inserts in Marvel Modern Age books were on the last page, and very large, up to 2" in size. The Modern Age Marvel books now from 2017-Present are 1" square inserts found usually on the 4th or 5th to the last page of book. This can easily imprint onto the back cover and surrounding pages.

 

 

10. Set a sheet of cut SRP (Silicone release paper) on your stack of 3 backer boards and comic book being pressed.

 

11. Get 3 magazine backer boards. Stack them on your stack of boards, comic, and srp paper that is set on heat press machine surface.

 

12. Place 3 magazine backer boards evenly. Stack them on your stack of boards, comic, and srp paper that is set on heat press machine surface.

 

13. Make sure book is inside all outside edges of top and bottom stacks of backer boards. If your book is outside the outer layer of boards, you will imprint vertical lines down your covers.

 

14. Use the pressure adjustment screw. Turn it clockwise to increase pressure. Counter-clockwise decreases pressure. The idea is to turn the knob to increase firm pressure at first before clamping down on book. When you are ready for the initial clamp of press, turn the knob counter clockwise and back it off slowly as you clamp down press. There should be firm but slight little resistance. Do not press too hard. The adjustment screw will help you with this. Think of it as driving a stickshift vehicle and you are learning the clutch and gas pedal. Using too much pressure will damage your book. This will pop staples, cause vertical lines or seams to travel down the length of the spine, or worse. Make certain to use firm but light pressure.

15. Press book with clamp down for 5-7 minutes and lift up clamp slowly. Sometimes the backer boards will stick to plate.

16. Flip book over so the opposite cover side is facing the hot plate of press. Some will recommend you replace the backer boards. I do not.

17. Repeat steps 1-15. After the second 5 minutes is up, you will simply shut OFF the heat press machine. Leave book inside press "as is" for 24-48 hours before removing.

18. After 24-48 hours is up, carefully and slowly lift clamp on press. Remove stack of boards and your book carefully and set on a flat, clean, level surface.

Use a large golden age or magazine sized back and board to slide under your book inside the press to slide it out safely. This works if you are tight on space or have another press next to it.

Slide bag/board under bottom srp paper carefully and slowly.

Slide bag/board under bottom srp paper very carefully and very slowly.

Now you can carefully lift the stack by the flap and place your fingers underneath both sides of bag/board supporting the weight and flatness of the book.

You can now safely walk the book over to another table for photographing or evaluation prior to bag and board.

You can now safely slide out the bottom supporting bag and board to carefully disassemble your press stack.

 

19. Remove boards and SRP paper by slowly sliding each one out one at a time in the process. You may need to gently grip the spine to you can slide each sheet out one at a time. If one side doesn't slide out by pulling from the bottom, try pulling from the top.

20. Photograph your results, or place inside a bag and board. You are done.

 

 

PRESSING SQUARE-BOUND SPINE GLUED GIANT COMIC BOOKS (ADVANCED)
There are certain books that come to mind: SILVER SURFER #4, GIANT SIZE X-MEN #1 & #2, GIANT SIZE WEREWOLF BY NIGHT, CONAN THE BARBARIAN ANNUAL #1, and others.

The thickness of spines can vary, but most are 0.03" - 0.05" inches thick.

This process is similar to all other methods outlined above but with some added steps:

1. The idea here is to use a spacer the same height as spine so it doesn't get crushed by accident. Use a ruler or digital calipers. Measure the thickness of book being pressed. Take note if any staples are popping through front cover or back cover. You may need to use a flathead screwdriver or putty knife to gently push staple prongs down flat.

2. Place 1 sheet of SRP paper on top and bottom of book. Place 1 magazine backer board on top and bottom of book.

3. Place a stack of magazine backer boards the same exact thickness and height of book. I also use steel plates as spacers because they are 0.04 or 1/8" inches thick, which is the average thickness of a glued squarebound spine comic book. (You can still do this while using metal steel plates)

3. Slide and postion stack of boards right up against the side of spine of book. Your stack should be positioned side-by-side of book in question.

4. No centerfold backer board in this book.

5. Set clamp down carefully and slowly on press, using adjustment knob as necessary to decrease pressure.

6. Press as normal with above steps on "HOW TO PRESS A BOOK"

 

 

USING 9" x 12" STEEL PLATES (ADVANCED)
Once you have mastered the above techniques, it's time to go the next level. I have tested this method to very successful results. These plates are metal, steel, cold, and heavy weighing in at 5lbs each. Using this method, you are basically converting your t-shirt press into a full blown industrial book press machine. The instructions are quite different. You start everything cold, set book, turn on press, let it get hot, turn off press, do not flip book. Simplified but very, very effective. I will explain:

The metal plates are 9" x 12", which is smaller than the 15" x 15" surface area of my press machines. This is fine, because the plates are still larger than the books being pressed. The 9" x 12" metal steel plates are 1/8" thick each. Total thickness of both plates is 2/8", or 1/4" of an inch, 3 backer boards, and you must include the thickness of your comic book. You must factor the 1/4" metal plates , backer boards, and the thickness of your book, that makes a 1/3" total average gap in your press. Because they are metal plates and not silicone, there is no give or flexibility, so it's always good to back the pressure adjustment knob back too much, than not enough.

Plates + 3 backer boards + comic book = 1/3" gap total in most cases. Different thicknesses of books will always rule the total gap needed for pressing with metal plates. Set the plates down on top of the included 15x15 red silicone mat that is already with the clamshell 15" x 15" press machines. The plates are 9" x 12", so they are smaller than the 15" x 15" surface area, but still larger than a comic book. Use your digital calipers or a ruler to measure the thickness of comic book and steel plates. Use pressure adjustment knob and make sure your gap matches total thickness of plates and book. If you do not, you risk popping staples or causing damage to the book being pressed. If a front or back cover is more severe I would place aforementioned side up towards to press machine's heat plate.

You will still want to place a backer board on steel plate, then SRP Paper, then comic book, SRP Paper, backer board, then top steel plate. Why? Dust particles, debris, and other elements could get on the plates and transfer to your book cover surfaces. You will drive yourself crazy over pebbling and wiping the plates clean every time. Steel also rusts so you need a protective barrier from your book and the steel plates. Any moisture can and will seep through the SRP paper.

Aluminum plates do not rust so that's a positive when pressing damp books. Aluminum doesn't retain heat as long so the bottom plate will not get hot as fast for very long. Aluminum is lighter yet also warps because it's more pliable and flexible. Both can be used in this application and both have their own merits and faults. Use whatever works best for you and your budget.


 

 

You'll want to use copy paper still for thin books or thin paperstock covers.

 

 

 

 

 

An alternative to steel plates is aluminum plates, which will not rust. However, aluminum is more flexible, lighter, and will not retain heat as long as steel.

 

 

USING CARDSTOCK WITH STEEL PLATES
65 lb. cardstock paper works signficantly better than copy paper. 1 sheet of cardstock paper does the job of 3-4 sheets of copy paper. You will get maximum results from spine damaged books using cardstock and steel plates in your press machine. This is the absolute best way to press books once you have mastered the starting phase of learning how to press comic books yourself. Cardstock paper is not recommended for damp or wet books. There is a risk of ripping the cover or causing spine splits. Same for Golden Age books with brittle pages. Here are the 65 lb cardstock sandwich recipes with steel plates for making your press-stack:

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


1. To prep, once you have ordered your 2 steel plates you will need to use gloves and sandpaper to completely smooth over the surfaces of the plates to remove burrs and scratches or other imperfections in the steel. I used 120 grit and 180 grit sandpaper with a block of wood. If there are deep scratches or burrs close your eyes and glide your fingertips across the surface. If you can feel the indents and scratches, you will need to use the other side of plate, or replace it entirely.

Leave the press machine OFF and COLD during this procedure. Look at the thickness of 2 steel plates on top of one another. Now use the adjustment knob of your press machine and counter clockwise turn that knob until there is a gap when the press is closed. Make sure this gap is bigger than the thickness of your comic book, and the 2 steel plates. This is crucial.

 


 

2. Set 1 steel plate measuring at least 9" x 12" or larger on your clean silicon mat of press. I still use the mat as a tiny bit of cusion when clamping press down. Keep your plate sideways so the book spine is in the inside of press where the most pressure is at clamp of press.

 

 

3. 65 lb cardstock paper, or the above pictured Super Bright 165 whiteness Inkjet copy paper is used as a buffer for digital codes, tattooz inserts, or other inserts inside a comic book. Do not use Laserjet copy paper. Laserjet copypaper can lift ink from glossy covers and glossy interior pages. Remember, cardstock paper works best for stubborn spine dents and Marvel digital code inserts. Some books will require copy paper vs cardstock paper, due to the cardstock paper being too thick. Thinner 65 lb cardstock paper or copypaper can get closer to the spine. Covers can split or come apart from the spine if you use the wrong method - so carefully study the spine and thickness when determining what to use.

 

 

 

4. Set a magazine backer board down on bottom steel plate. This acts as a buffer from dust, dirt, debris, rust, and moisture from your book. Make sure backer boards are flat side in, glossy side outwards away from book. Set a bottom sheet of cut SRP (Silicone release paper) on your bottom metal steel plate.

 

 

 

5. You can buy large 16×24 inch sheets of SRP paper from ULINE and cut them into 4 smaller sheets.

 

 

Set your book sandwich on SRP paper resting on backer board and bottom steel plate.

 

6. Do not reuse copy paper, backer board, or SRP paper using this technique. It is scrap after 1 use.

 

 

 

7. Place a backer board at centerfold. Place the board up against the staples. Do not place the backer board under the staple prongs. The backer board is acting as the same height of the staples, so as to not imprint staples into the interior pages of the book. If you place it underneath the staple prongs, you will have indents from both staples on the opposite side of staple. Trust me. If you have spine ticks, place 2 sheets of copy paper under front cover and back cover. Depending on how deep the spine ticks are, you may need to place copy paper at page 2 and page 3 of front and back of covers. Make certain your copy paper and boards are snug up against the spine as close as possible. Set your book "sandwich" carefully placed in the middle on bottom SRP paper and bottom steel plate.

 

7b. If you have a digital code in your book, see recipe above for the stacking of paper and boards. If the book is thin with fewer pages, you can use a magazine backer board or sheets of copy paper on the following page of digital code insert. Thicker books require copy paper. Do not reuse your copy paper. It is now scrap paper after 1 use. 65lb cardstock paper works best instead of copy paper.

 

 

Or an older Marvel comic with the larger 2" square digital code insert like this:

Avenging Spider-man #9 has a large 2" digital code insert on last page. Use 3 sheets of copy paper as a buffer for the back cover. Use 2 sheets of paper as a buffer on the page before the last page. You will press using light pressure.

 

Older digital code inserts in Marvel Modern Age books were on the last page, and very large, up to 2" in size. The Modern Age Marvel books now from 2017-Present are 1" square inserts found usually on the 4th or 5th to the last page of book. This can easily imprint onto the back cover and surrounding pages.

 

Place a top sheet of SRP Paper on your book sandwich.

 

 

8. Set a top sheet of cut SRP (Silicone release paper) on your comic book. Set another top magazine backer board on top of top SRP Paper and comic book being pressed. This acts as a buffer from dust, dirt, debris, rust, and moisture from your book.

 

 

9. Set your top steel plate carefully and calmly on your stack of boards, comic, and srp paper that is set on heat press machine surface. Make certain the book is inside all outside edges of top and bottom stacks of backer boards. If your book is outside the outer layer of boards, you will imprint vertical lines down your covers.

 

 

10. Remember that crucial "gap" I mentioned above in step 1? Make sure your gap is as large as the thickness of both plates, backer boards, and your book being pressed.

 

Most steel plate book sandwiches will be around 0.35-0.40 inches thick.

 

 

11. You want the press to clamp down very lightly on the plates. Gently and meaningful but not forced or aggressive. Make sure the press machine is OFF.

 

 

12. Use the pressure adjustment screw. Turn it clockwise to increase pressure. Counter-clockwise decreases pressure. The idea is to turn the knob to increase firm pressure at first before clamping down on book. When you are ready for the initial clamp of press, turn the knob counter clockwise and back it off slowly as you clamp down press. There should be firm but slight little resistance. Do not press too hard. The adjustment screw will help you with this. Think of it as driving a stickshift vehicle and you are learning the clutch and gas pedal. Using too much pressure will damage your book. This will pop staples, cause vertical lines or seams to travel down the length of the spine, or worse. Make certain to use firm but light pressure.

 

 

13. Turn the press ON. As soon as the desired temperature of 145-160 degrees is met, shut the press machine OFF. Do not wait for the timer to count down.

 

 

14. Once the press machine has reached desired temperature, you do not need to flip the book or remove anything. The metal plates are now 150-160 degrees, so you can't handle the plate temperature anyway. Since steel is a great conductor for heat, both surfaces of the book are flashed with instant heat from both sides. If you are pressing damp books from the humidity chamber, look further down this guide for separate procedure.

The book and plates will cool back down to a very cool, cold temperature once 24 hours have passed. After 24-48 hours, you are now ready to remove the book from press machine:

 

Remove top magazine backer board. Use a large golden age or magazine sized back and board to slide under your book sandwich inside the press to slide it out safely. This works if you are tight on space or have another press next to it.

Slide bag/board under bottom srp paper or backer board carefully and slowly.

Slide bag/board under bottom srp paper very carefully and very slowly.

Now you can carefully lift the stack by the flap and place your fingers underneath both sides of bag/board supporting the weight and flatness of the book.

You can now safely walk the book over to another table for photographing or evaluation prior to bag and board.

You can now safely slide out the bottom supporting bag and board to carefully disassemble your press stack.

15. After 24-48 hours is up, carefully and slowly lift clamp on press. Remove top plate very slowly and carefully. Try to lift the plate straight up and not at an angle. Set your book sandwich stack down carefully and on a flat, clean, level surface. I would not reuse copy paper, backing boards, or SRP paper using this method.

16. Remove boards and SRP paper by slowly sliding each one out one at a time in the process. Latex gloves help grip the book from the spine as you slide each sheet away from book.

27. Photograph your results, or place inside a bag and board. You are done.

If you are pressing a squarebound giant sized book, the steps are the same. Only deviation from this is to make a stack of backer boards the same height as book before setting top metal steel plate on top of book with stack of backer boards pressed up against alongside spine.

 

 

 

WHAT IS A "COLDPRESS"?
A "coldpress" is just that, a cold press machine. Simply shutting off the press machine when the timer beeps (or your phone alarm) and leaving the comic book inside the press machine, left alone and un-touched for a minimum of 12 hours. The recommended time for leaving a comic book in the coldpress is at 24 hours for maximum benefit. This prevents any sort of reversion or flaring that could take place.

 

 

 

DON'T GET OVERWHELMED
For those of you still reading all this, it is a lot to take in all at once. It's easy to look at your collection of books and think, "Wow, this is going to take a lifetime to press all of these books!" What you will soon realize is after awhile you begin to screen your own books and weigh in labor over time spent versus book value. After several months you begin to press less books worth $10 or even books not worth the recycled paper they are printed on. "If you can only press one book per 24 hour day, that's only 365 books a year! I have over 2,000 books!" If you are serious about pressing out your entire collection, I would advise strongly that you purchase a second or even a third press machine. Then suddenly you are pressing 1,000 books a year. This endeavor should be fun and rewarding, don't look at it as a full-time job. Which brings me to the next topic...

 

 

 

 

DO NOT PRESS TWO BOOKS AT ONCE
What if you have a 15" x 15" press machine? Comic books are only 7" x 11" in size for most common books. A simple light press for two books at once sounds like a great idea. It's easy to want to double down on your workload with one machine, right? 7" x 11" x 2 = 14" x 11" so 2 would fit.


Do not press two comic books at once inside one press machine.


Do not set 2 books in one press machine.

Respectfully to all of you reading this guide, this is not advised. You are not ever going to get the same results this way, and you could damage one of the spines or both. Purchase another press machine if you want to press 2 books per day/session. T-Shirt Press Machines put more pressure at the back of the platen on the clamshell press machine. The swivel unit press machines press evenly from the middle outward using the spring setup but it's dangerous to use this method due to uneven pressure at the direct center of platen pushing downwards from the middle of spine outward. What this means is you'll still have uneven pressure at the top and bottom of spines on both books. It might seem like a good idea if you are just doing a light press to smooth the bumps and waves out... but it's not.

 


I repeat, do not set 2 books in one press machine... even if identical.

Comic books are mass produced on large heavy bulky industrial machines. There are variable tolerances to the production and range of "runs", when they have to change out paper rolls and ink tubes. With that said, even 2 identical comic books do not have identical spines. Staples move, centerfolds can become off center. They are not precision hand-made Italian supercars. Sorry, I just think it's bad advice for new people learning how to press comic books. Once you've mastered the concepts it's easy to want to get ahead of yourself. Buying additional press machines is a more practical and safer solution for you, and for the books. I strongly do not encourage pressing more than one book at a time, and I only stress this because I already can see there being an interest immediately that could potentially damage books.

 

 

 

Now for advanced topics once you have mastered the basics...

 

MODERN AGE QUICKPRESS METHOD
Pressing modern age comic books with glossy covers and glossy thin interior pages can be pressed very quickly and reliably well with confidence using this method which only takes a few hours instead of 24 hours. You can press at least 4-5 books a day using this method. The process works by flash heating the covers and pages then letting the book gradually cool back down. This is very effective for covers that have pressure dents or wavy bends or finger bends to cover and first few pages of interior. Warning: Some smaller independent press comic books and crowdfunded books from Patreon or Kickstarter will melt pages to cardstock and backer boards. This method has been tested safely on most modern age DC and Marvel comic books.

You will need: Steel Plates, High Temperature of 162 degrees, 65 lb cardstock paper, magazine backer boards, and srp paper. Please review the image below to build your bookstack. This is the same manner as a spine ticked damaged book using steel plates. See below:

 

 

  1. This method is not recommended for small independent press comics from Kickstarter or Patreon or any similar crowdfunded campgain source. The paperstock seems to melt the pages to cardstock or backer boards at centerfold. Be sure to test this procedure on a similar book before trying it on a high dollar Patreon or Kickstarter edition variant comic book if you are unsure. This method has been safely tested on modern age DC and Marvel comic books.
  2. Leave press machine off and cold. Preset temperature to 162 degrees for 225 seconds. Turn OFF press machine. If you forget, wait till machine is cooled back down.
  3. Place bottom steel plate on press machine.
  4. Set a clean unused magazine backer board on bottom steel plate.
  5. Place 1 sheet of clean SRP paper on magazine backer board.
  6. Place a clean unused backerboard at centerfold of comic book.
  7. Place 65 lb cardstock under front cover, back cover (before and after marvel digital code insert sticker if necessary).
  8. Place 1 sheet of clean SRP paper on comic book.
  9. Set a clean unused magazine backer board on SRP paper.
  10. Place top steel plate on bookstack carefully.
  11. Make sure press machine pressure is measured with calipers or ruler and adjust accordingly. Press very lightly with minimal firmness when press is clamped down. Close press machine while OFF and clamped down.
  12. Turn press machine ON (preset at 162 for 225 seconds) let plate heat bookstack up gradually. When press machine reaches core temperature of 162, there should be only approximately 30-40 seconds remaining on timer.
  13. When timer beeps, shut OFF press machine. Wait 2 hours.
  14. After 2 hours, flip the book. Open press machine carefully and make a new bookstack and repeat by flipping the book to do the other side. Do not reuse boards or SRP paper. It is wrinkled and could press patterns onto cover.
  15. After the other side beeps, turn off press machine and wait 2 hours before you remove book. The pages should not be stuck together but if so, gently and very very slowly and slightly bend the book at the middle with both hands by placing your fingers on back cover and thumbs on front cover, holding the left and right edges by the palms of your gloved hands in order to make the pages release. You will hear the pages unstick together. Otherwise you may carefully open each page slowly and slightly. I do not recommend leaving pages stuck together if you are sending off to grading. Do not let grading companies grade a book with stuck pages. You will get hit hard on stuck pages or curling pages and take a hit resulting in lower grades.
  16. If your book has no rounded corners, no spine ticks, no scratches, and no other imperfections that might count against it...this method is guaranteed to give you 9.8s. It is up to you to pre-screen for that 9.8 or it will end up a 9.6.

 

 

 

USING A BALL BEARING AND SEALING TACK IRON (ADVANCED)
A dent or divot in the cover of a book can be frustrating. This can be pre-existing from a previous pressing job, or from debris and dirt on cover of book before pressing. You will need: One ball bearing, 1.5″ inch diameter, and a tack iron.

If you see a pre-existing divot or dent in your cover you can try this trick out before pressing. Or, if you had some dirt or debris on the pressing plate and/or comic book then you can try this method to fix your mistake. Find or purchase a one and a half inch (1.5″) steel ball bearing.



1.5" Ball Bearing. Wipe your balls first! They are coated with lubricant to prevent rust.

 

A tacking iron speeds this process up instead of using the press machine. You can use the press machine if you don’t have a tacking iron. The tacking iron helps localize the area being focused on. Start by placing SRP underneath the cover being worked on. Make sure a clean smooth surface is underneath the comic book. I use a golden age mylite2+fullback so I can move the book around with ease.

 

After placing SRP above and below cover, heat and flatten the spot with a tack iron for only a few seconds.

After placing SRP above and below cover, heat and flatten the spot with a tack iron for only a few seconds at a time. Press gently downwards in intervals, but not when sliding back and forth or you can cause scratches.

Place a small cut sheet of SRP on top of the cover being worked on. You can place a backer board underneath the cover as well if the initial process doesn’t work the first time. Keep in mind this method doesn’t always work. For example, if you can see the divot pass through onto the next 4 or 5 pages of the book, this method might not be successful for you. If the divot or dent removed ink and caused a color breaking divot you can press it back out but the ink removed will still show the dent.

After placing SRP above and below cover, heat and flatten the spot with a tack iron for only a few seconds.

After you now have the SRP and backer board in place, begin heating up the tack iron to 140-150 degrees for moderns or 160-165 degrees for bronze and copper. After just a few seconds the book should be warm to the touch.

 

Set the ball bearing down on the heated spot, and press down firmly with the palm of your hand, rolling the ball bearing around the spot in a circular motion.

 

 

Place your ball bearing down on top of the SRP on cover and begin rolling the ball around the location of the divot. Press firmly with the palm of your hand as you press down with pressure and roll the ball in circular motions.

 

 

You can pinch the ball bearing as well and roll it around firmly in a circular motion. You can also pinch the ball bearing with your thumb and 2 index fingers while pressing downward with firm pressure. Alternatively, you can carefully open the cover and perform the process on the underside of the cover if you can see the bump from other side. This method is risky because you can put stress on the spine and create spine ticks. Only try the underside if you feel the ball bearing isn’t working well on the top side of the cover.

Set the ball bearing down on the heated spot, and press down firmly with the palm of your hand, rolling the ball bearing around the spot in a circular motion.The divot is gone from the trade dress logo on cover. The cover will be wavy from the localized tack iron. You are now ready to press the book as you normally would.The divot is gone from the trade dress logo on cover. The cover will be wavy from the localized tack iron. You are now ready to press the book as you normally would.The divot is gone from the trade dress logo on cover. The cover will be wavy from the localized tack iron. You are now ready to press the book as you normally would.

 

 

Divot is now out of front cover of book. You are now ready to press the book as usual.

 

 

After 2 complete pressings, the divot is completely gone from the cover of book.

 

 

BUT THE BALL BEARING AND TACK IRON ISN'T WORKING
Sometimes it isn't about immediate results. The heat from the tack iron on number 2 or 3 at extreme localized applied heat and rolling a steel ball bearing around works at a much deeper level than you'd think. On the surface some books will not display progress until after pressing.

In the following example given, this copy of HE-MAN and the MASTERS of the UNIVERSE #18 (1st appearance of She-Ra) had deep indention on Battlecat's right eye and along right side front cover. The dents were all the way through the first 6 pages of book including front cover. There was also some dents on middle back cover as well. I spent a good hour working each page out with a tack iron turned to setting 3 (which is over 250 degrees) and applied firm pressure with a 1.5" inch steel ball bearing. No matter what, it seemed nothing was working. So I pressed the book as usual anyway....with superb results.

 

Be patient and keep at it. The tack iron and ball bearing are working at the deepest layer of paper fibers using localized heat and pressure. Science!

 

This book first had a steel ball bearing and tack iron on the first 6 pages including cover before pressed. The results of the ball bearing and tack iron were not successful...or so it appeared that way. Sometimes this technique works by loosening the paper fibers up so the press machine can actually do its job successfully. Do not be discouraged if it looks like the ball bearing and tack iron aren't working. Chances are...it is working and you don't know it yet. Press as usual and see what happens.

 

 

 

 

BLUNTED SPINE FIX (ADVANCED)
Start with a light press using backer boards and SRP with the 15×15 press. After 5 minutes on each side completely flattened out, lightly fold the book back over and press down to make your new fold.

Start with a light press using backer boards and SRP with the 15×15 press.

After 5 minutes on each side completely flattened out, lightly fold the book back over and press down to make your new fold.

 

An example of how to create a new centerfold for spine roll fixes using a swivel heat press machine. First begin by laying the book flat in a hydration chamber for 1-2 hours. Next, lay the book flat face down in the press with 2 backer boards at the staples on top and botton. Flip the book after 5 minutes on 160 degrees. Begin making your new fold by folding the book in half and pink the edge tight and make your new fold with the press for 2 minutes. Proceed to press as normal afterwards. 1977 Ms Marvel #1.

 

 

SPINE ROLL FIX (ADVANCED)
Spine roll fix alignments can be fun. I mean that sincerely. They can be real fun and rewarding to work with. One method I’ve seen now in the pressing world is to adjust that spine so all the spine creases and dents move to the back of the book for a better eye appeal inside a graded case. This does not trick the graders nor are you trying to pull “a fast one” but you are making the book have a better eye appeal when considering reselling or displaying the book.

When aligning the spine, the first step is to flatten the entire book at the centerfold. This can be very stressful on the outside spine, and the staples inside. You can crush the staples right through the book if you are not careful! You can also create new stress lines on the outside of the book. Here is how to prevent all of this:

  1. Steam the book with some humidity. Do this with a clothes steamer or a Do-it-Yourself Humidity Hydration Chamber.
  2. Set the press to 160 degrees. This part of the process does not matter if golden age/silver/modern/foil.
  3. Get a 1/8” stack of backer boards, gloss free, or at least put the gloss away from the covers. Place them down the center of the rubber pad on press.
  4. Get the book in question. Find the staples. Find the center.
  5. Flatten the book from the inside face down, staples down. Set the book carefully onto the stack of backer boards 90 degrees perpendicular to the pad. If you are using the Tivor Swivel Mount Heat Press Machine, you will have an overhang obviously. That’s fine. You’re going to rotate in 5 minutes to do the overhang side if so.
  6. Stick one backer board on top of your spine. Carefully and slowly lower the press onto the comic and make sure the spine flattens out.
  7. Keep the book this way for 5 minutes.
  8. If you are using the Tivor swivel press machine keep reading. Otherwise skip to step 13: Now swivel everything around and press the overhang portion of the comic book spine. Press for 5 minutes.
  9. If using the larger 15×15 heat press machine, press for 5 additional minutes.
  10. Now remove the book, keep the boards there. Maybe take the bottom backer board and put on top in case there was a staple indent.
  11. Flip the book over on its opposite side, with the staples now facing up.
  12. Set the book carefully onto the stack of backer boards with the staples facing up – 90 degrees perpendicular to the pad. You will have an overhang obviously.
  13. Stick one backer board on top of your spine with the staples facing up. Carefully and slowly lower the press onto the comic and make sure the spine flattens out.
  14. Keep the book this way for 5 minutes.
  15. Now swivel everything around and press the overhang portion of the comic book spine. Press for 5 minutes.
  16. The book should now be completely flattened out after 10 minutes total duration of pressing flat against cardboard backers.
  17. You are going to make your own new centerfold now. Remove all backer boards and anything left in the press. Only should have a rubber pad and a metal plate above, nothing else. No SRP Paper, either.
  18. Using latex gloves, you are going to fold the book carefully in half. Stand the book up on its bottom edge when doing so.
  19. Pinch the middle center with your index finger and thumb TIGHT so no movement happens between pages.
  20. Stick the pinched comic with your fingers in sideways, allowing 7/8 of the comic’s surface on top of the rubber pad.
  21. Bring the metal plate down onto the comic and press down . You want your fingers so close to the plate that it will almost press your thumb down.
  22. Do not let the book move or travel with the press. You get only one shot at this!
  23. The reason you are using 7/8 of the surface is to minimize travel of the book when the press goes down on the book. If you barely place the comic in close at the spine, the entire book will travel and move on you as its being pressed! This step will take you time and practice to get the hang of it. Start small on simple dollar books to practice spine roll fixes!

 

 

 

SPINE ROLLS (ADVANCED)
1952 Vault of Horror #23. Before and After photos showing an example of a successful and healthy spine roll fix on a golden age horror comic book. (Click to ZOOM)

Books like this should be approached in a very careful manner, especially given the age and state of the book's pages. What is necessary to do is create a new centerfold. The way to start this is by completely flattening the centerfold cover side up and cover side down.

 

 

 

SPINE ALIGNMENTS AND BLUNTED CORNERS (ADVANCED)
You can actually do the spine realignment on any book, even a brand new modern book! I recommend this for blunted corners and deep spine indents or bunched up corners. This method is preferred instead of just shoving backer boards into your centerfolds and interior covers. If you only use backer boards or stacks of paper, you risk imprinting edges of the paper or backer boards into your books. Evidence of this is a simple vertical line that travels the length of the spine.

 

Blunted non color breaking spines can be intimidating.

 

 


THE HUMIDIFICATION PROCESS (ADVANCED)
Paper records such as maps, newspapers, and documents that have been rolled or folded for long periods of time often may be safely flattened using carefully controlled humidification.

Not all books require moisture. Most modern comics should not be introduced to humidity or steam. However, some older books would benefit from humidity. Brittle pages, Golden Age books, Silver Age books, frustrating blunted corners without color breaks, blunted spines, spine rolls, and rolled up or folded in half comic books. But why would you use moisture on books? The reason for this is the fibers of the paper must be relaxed for the process of pressing to actually take hold and remain. You can do this with a simple humidifier or clothes fabric steamer. Use the steamer for a few seconds to only make the pages curl. As soon as paper movement is seen, move to a different area or stop using steam. When creating new centerfolds, fixing spine denting, and working with golden age books – you are required to use steam. This is a very delicate process and should be used with moderation.

 

 

 

KNOW WHEN TO USE HUMIDITY
I cannot stress this enough: not all books require moisture. Do not place a new modern age glossy cover, glossy interior pages comic book inside a humidity chamber. Chances are it will ruin the book. The modern age new books produced now are very forgiving with press machines without moisture. Do not leave a comic book inside humidity chamber over 6 hours. You will start to wash out colors.

Use humidity on books that feature:

  1. Golden Age
  2. Silver Age
  3. Subscription folds
  4. Bunched spines
  5. Deep creaselines
  6. Spine straightening
  7. Spine rolls
  8. Stubborn creasing
  9. Corner flaps

 

Do NOT use humidity on books that feature:

  1. Glossy paper
  2. Glossy thin paperstock covers
  3. Thin books with less than 5 pages
  4. New Modern Age comics 2002-Present
  5. Sticker or Tattooz inserts
  6. Brittle pages
  7. Loose pieces
  8. Spine splits greater than 1"
  9. Detached covers
  10. Detached pages
  11. Rusty staples

 

 

 

 

DISTILLED WATER
Always use distilled water. There are no minerals or dirt in distilled water. Otherwise you will get water spots and staining from the minerals if you do not use distilled water. It is recommended to empty the water chamber after several uses, or you will develop unwanted mildew. Do not use tap water. Water stains and water spots can develop on your book. Tap water also can cause off-white pages.

 

 

USING HUMIDIFICATION
Most books will not require humidity. If a book is old, brittle, feels very dry and rigid to the touch – then you should probably use humidity. Time and patience will guide you. Always better to use not enough humidity with a slightly disappointing press with no damage to the book and do it again than to use TOO MUCH humidity and ruin the book, right?! Too much humidity and too much heat can cause edge flaring and a wavy cover. If you are using a clothes steamer, be sure to steam from a safe 1-2 foot distance so droplets of water don’t splash on the book. This can create light circle spots when dry. Also do not over steam staples or they will rust. The safest method would be to make your own hydration humidifier chamber with basic supplies at Home Depot or Walmart.

 

 

STEAM INSIDE YOUR HUMIDIFICATION CHAMBER (OPTIONAL, ADVANCED)
The recommended and average method for this technique is to use room temperature distilled water. Some applications will require a different accelerated approach. A lot of this depends on trial and error, experience, and varying conditons of books.

3 recommended safe methods for most books:

1. While using room temperature distilled water, you should leave the book inside the chamber for 12 hrs. Longer durations will start to wash out color. You will fade the cover if left in chamber for too long with too much distilled water at the bottom of tank.

2. While using 1 cup of boiling distilled water inside with a half bowl of room temperature distilled water, you should leave the book inside the chamber for 1 hour.

3. For really stubborn books that have heavy subscription folds or creaselines: Boil 2 cups of distilled water on the stove top. Pour the 2 cups of boiling distilled water inside your chamber with 1 half gallon of room temperature distilled water inside the entire bottom of tub to provide accelerated steam evenly to the book. Do not boil more than 1-2 cups. It would introduce more than 120% humidity with temperatures too hot that will cause warping and damage to your book.



MAKE YOUR OWN HUMIDIFICATION CHAMBER (ADVANCED)
Go to Walmart and find the kitchen department. Here is a step-by-step pictoral using simple materials at Walmart for under $30:

You will need: 1 gallon of distilled water, some terry cloths from the kitchen department, a 40qt storage tub, cooking grill grate, some plastic cups and a plastic bowl.

 

 

Make sure you use distilled water.

 

Fill the bowl with distilled water as much humidity you think the book will need. See chart above for recommended water levels.

 

Set your cooking grate on top of 4 plastic cups taller than the bowl (water level)

 

Set a terry cloth on cooking grate. Then place a magazine backer board on top of terry cloth. Place book on backer board as pictured above.

 

Now place another magazine backer board on top of your book.

 

Place another terry cloth on top of boards and comic book for protection and a little weight.

 

Close lid up tight and place something heavy on top of lid to retain seal inside to trap the humidity inside tank.

 

2001 Marvel Comics SPIDER-MAN 2099 #1 Second Printing Corner ding

 

2001 Marvel Comics SPIDER-MAN 2099 #1 Second Printing Spine ding

 

2001 Marvel Comics SPIDER-MAN 2099 #1 Second Printing horizontal bend from left to right across entire book and throughout all pages of book from blister packaging comic book originally came inside of with packaged action figure toy from Toybiz.

 

After 12 hours inside humidity tank as pictured above. Pressed using steel plates and magazine backer boards with 65 lb cardstock paper at 160F degrees for 5 minutes and left overnight in coldpress for 24 hours.

 

After 12 hours inside humidity tank as pictured above. Pressed using steel plates and magazine backer boards with 65 lb cardstock paper at 160F degrees for 5 minutes and left overnight in coldpress for 24 hours.

 

 

A long time ago, I had previously been using the Conair Clothes Steamer method, but it's not reliable and you risk damaging books with water spots. This way is deemed much safer and dependable.

During the initial tests I ever did was 18 hours left overnight inside the chamber at room temperature distilled water. After much testing and trial and error, for most books, I have determined you should leave the book overnight from 9pm to 9am (or adjust accordingly to your schedule).

Place the book as normal flat on a magazine backer board and place an additonal magazine backer board on top of it. Cover the book and boards with terrycloth for protection. Leave overnight to let the paper fibers naturally absorb the humidity from the bowl of water below grate.

The safest controlled method is leaving 1 book in humidity chamber for 12 hours at room temperature distilled water. Start at 9pm and remove damp book at 9am.

There are several websites available online, including the Library of Congress at your disposal. According to the National Park Service, “Paper records such as maps, newspapers, and documents that have been rolled or folded for long periods of time often may be safely flattened using carefully controlled humidification."

SOURCE: https://www.nps.gov/museum/publications/conserveogram/13-02.pdf

 


 

DO NOT REMOVE THE STAPLES
So with that in mind, you really should remove the steel staples from the comic book. With that disclaimer stated, we aren’t going to remove the staples from the comic book. We are not restoring the comic book. We are only cleaning and flattening the book. Removing/replacing staples counts as restoration, and we don’t want that. Since the duration time period inside our homemade humidification chamber will be only be 15-30 minutes, I do not believe that is long enough for iron oxidation to set in on a staple that currently shows no signs of rust. Scientifically, and depending on your climate conditions, it’s more realistic to assume light rust would begin to set in at the microscopic level within 2 days. Steel can start to corrode (microscopically) immediately upon exposure to the elements. Since we are leaving the comic book in for 15-30 minutes, it’s probably not going to cause rust. The heat press will absorb the humidity moisture and dampness of the book within minutes before rust can take proceed.

 

 

 

 

 

PRESSING DAMP BOOKS
There is a risk of warping and flaring using too much humidity on damp books from the humidity chamber. Sometimes we leave books in the chamber for several hours, or even overnight, due to deep stubborn creaselines or folds. If you use only SRP with nothing else, moisture can set in too fast before evaporation can take place. This seeps through the SRP paper and will need to be replaced after 5 minutes. When the press machine is in the shutdown phase cooling off, not enough moisture is removed from paperstock and backerboards. Moisture collects and causes moisture patterns all over the SRP paper. Worse, mold can begin to form on the cover as well. It is crucial to use backer boards as a cushion to separate the moisture and dampness from setting in and seeping onto your books. You will need to press the book 3 times in 5 minute intervals, changing and replacing all backer boards and srp paper each time. On the 3rd cycle you will leave the book in the press for 24 hours before removing. Because this step uses up large amounts of backer boards, I set aside magazine backer boards that have been used only one time and I use those for the stacks of 3s for cycle 1 and cycle 2 since the book is at its peak dampness. On cycle 3 I use a fresh clean set of backer boards for the final press.

 

 

  1. Press damp book for 5 minutes at 150-155 degrees, using 3 backer boards on top and below book / SRP paper as shown in image above. You cannot use copy paper under covers on the first 2 cycles. Covers can split when damp.
  2. Use a box fan on HI for 5 mintues to cool press machine. If you do not have a fan, it's okay - just don't touch that plate of the press machine or you will burn yourself.
  3. For cycle 2, replace all backer boards and SRP paper with dry, fresh paperstock. Make sure backer boards are flat side out, glossy side inwards towards book or plate.
  4. On cycle 2, press less damp book for 5 minutes at 150-155 degrees, using 3 backer boards on top and below book / SRP paper as shown in image above.
  5. For cycle 3, replace all backer boards and SRP paper with dry, fresh paperstock. Make sure backer boards are flat side out, glossy side inwards toward book or plate.
  6. On cycle 3, press dried book for 5 minutes at 155-160 degrees, using 3 backer boards on top and below book / SRP paper as shown in image above. You can now use copy paper under covers to push out spine ticks but not backerboards or cardstock. Covers can split when damp.
  7. After 3rd and final cycle of heat duration of minutes is up, shut off press and leave overnight for 24 hours.

 

 

 

USING STEEL PLATES ON DAMP BOOKS
There is a danger of rust to using hot steel plates on damp books from the humidity chamber. Sometimes we leave books in the chamber for several hours, or even overnight, due to deep stubborn creaselines or folds. If you use only SRP paper and metal plates, iron oxide (rust) forms on the bottom plate. This seeps through the SRP paper and will cause black spots all over the cover facing the bottom plate. When the press machine is in the shutdown phase cooling off, the bottom plate cools down much faster than the top plate. Moisture collects and causes rust patterns all over the SRP paper. Worse, mold can begin to form on the cover as well. It is crucial to use backer boards as a cushion to separate the moisture and rust from seeping onto your books.

 

  1. Press very damp book for 5 minutes at 150-155 degrees, using 3 backer boards on top and below book / SRP paper as shown in image above. You can use copy paper under covers but not backerboards or cardstock. Covers can split when damp.
  2. Use a box fan on HI for 5 mintues to cool plates. If you do not have a fan, it's okay but you will be working with very hot steel plates so try to let it cool for a bit before touching the top steel plate and work quickly or you will burn your fingers.
  3. Wear protective handgear such as gloves/mitts and set top plate on trivet.
  4. For cycle 2, replace all backer boards and SRP paper with dry, fresh paperstock. Make sure backer boards are flat side out, glossy side inwards toward book or plate.
  5. On cycle 2, press less damp book for 5 minutes at 150-155 degrees, using 3 backer boards on top and below book / SRP paper as shown in image above.
  6. For cycle 3, replace all backer boards and SRP paper with dry, fresh paperstock. Make sure backer boards are flat side out, glossy side inwards toward book or plate.
  7. On cycle 3, press dried book for 5-10 minutes at 155-160 degrees, using 3 backer boards on top and below book / SRP paper as shown in image above. You can now use copy paper under covers to push out spine ticks (but not backerboards or cardstock). Covers can split when damp.
  8. After 3rd and final cycle of heat duration of minutes is up, shut off press and leave overnight for 24 hours.

 

Bottom SRP Paper from a damp book using only steel plates and SRP paper.

Top SRP Paper from a damp book using only steel plates and SRP paper.

 

 

 

 

The Overstreet Guide To Grading Comics
The Overstreet Guide To Grading Comics includes the 10-point grading system, as well as exhaustive descriptions of Primary and Split Grades, examples of each grade with more than 200 full-color images in all, articles on storage, preservation, and restoration, a look at the independent, third-party grading companies, and much more. You absolutely must own this book if you plan to buy or sell on ebay. Use this book also as a way to argue if a book is not in the advertised condition if you feel you are ripped off.

 

 

 

 

 

YOUTUBE TUTORIAL VIDEO PLAYLIST
I recently started some tutorial videos that illustrate different methods and techniques covered on this page. The videos do not have audio or sound and are shot with a gopro camera in 1080p. I don't want to be that guy, but they take a really long time to produce and edit so, "Please give a like and subscribe" Thanks!

How to Press Comic Books Playlist by KaptainMyke on Youtube

How to Press Comic Books Playlist by KaptainMyke on Youtube

 

 

 

JOIN US
There is a dedicated Facebook Group called "KaptainMyke Comic Book Pressing" for anyone to join and contribute ideas open for discussion. Ask questions about this guide or show off your own books! Anyone is welcome to join. I firmly believe the spread of accurate free information will help us all keep books preserved and conserved. You may find the Facebook Group at this link here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/kaptainmykecomicpressing

 

 

CONCLUSION
The overall goal of this guide is simple: Press books in a manner so that others cannot detect the book has been pressed. Light pressure, not firm or hard pressure. Do not burn the book, do not pop the staples, and do not spin the books on surfaces. For temperatures, 150-160 degrees or lower seems to be the “sweet spot” on most books to play it safe. Pressing under high heat for less than 5-7 minutes on each side is good for most books. Keep moisture and humidity to a minimum on your books. Always keep a timer with you and don’t forget to set your timer! These steps are some of the things that can be done to successfully press a comic book, magazine, or poster with minimal to no damage to the item being pressed.

These tips will hopefully save you money, and guide you along the way as YOU learn and pick up new ideas and better ways to accomplish things. I am not a professional presser, and I’m not a professional grader. However, these are the methods I use when I press comic books as a hobbyist.

All of this is a learning process. I encourage you all to share your ideas among everyone so that we can all prevent damage to one another’s books. I am open to any feedback and suggestions. I also reside in a coastal Northwestern state, which is more humid than inland states. Your results may vary based on humidity and temperature of the climate you reside in.

Thank you!

KaptainMyke

 

 

 

Check out the KaptainMyke Comic Book Pressing Group on Facebook:
KaptainMyke Comic Book Pressing Group

 

 

 

1953 E.C. Publications SHOCK SUSPENSTORIES #12
(Before and After)

 

 

 







1952 E.C. Publications VAULT OF HORROR #23
(Before and After)




 

CONTACT
CONTACT US
FACEBOOK
TWITTER
ABOUT
ABOUT US

HELP
FRIENDS
MIRROR SITES
CAFEPRESS
REDBUBBLE
ZAZZLE
CELEBRATING 15 YEARS OF
Unique Funny Tshirts, Movie Quote Shirts, TV Quote Shirts
Privacy Policy Terms    Guaranteed Hacker Safe  
©2002-2018 KaptainMyke